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Facebook reveals 'thinnest' VR headset that lets wearers see holograms

Secretive Facebook research lab reveals the ‘world’s thinnest virtual reality headset’ that looks like a pair of sunglasses and has holographic lenses for a more ‘vivid’ viewing experience

  • Facebook has revealed details of the ‘thinnest VR display demonstrated to date’
  • It uses special refraction tech that rids of the bulky lenses of modern headsets 
  • The lenses project realistic-looking 3D holographics with a vivid colour range 

Facebook has revealed the ‘world’s thinnest’ virtual reality (VR) headset that looks like a pair of sunglasses and has holographic lenses for a more ‘vivid’ viewing experience. 

The social network, which has its own department dedicated to VR technologies, says the concept lenses are less than 0.3 inches (9mm) thick.  

The technology, which has been detailed in a research paper, uses a special light refraction technique to enable the ‘thinnest VR display demonstrated to date’. 

The lenses use holography – a photographic technique that records light scattered from an object and presents it as three-dimensional.

Holographics use laser light sources, which provide a wider range of colours than LEDs common in today’s VR headsets, phones, computers and TVs.  

This allows wearers to enjoy a set of vivid and saturated colours like a ‘brightly lit neon sign’ or the ‘iridescent sheen of a butterfly wing’.  

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The concept lenses modules mounted into a frame. This research device was used to capture the green image shown below (some components are mounted externally

Facebook has provided a taster of the holographic visual experience in a racing game, albeit without the improved colour range. 

‘Facebook Reality Labs is always exploring new optical architectures to improve form factor, comfort, and optical performance,’ it said in a blog post. 

‘Laser illumination is used to deliver a much wider gamut of colours to VR displays, and progress is made toward scaling resolution to the limit of human vision. 

Today’s chunky VR headset would be shrunk down to the size of a standard set of sunglasses

To Facebook’s knowledge, the concept lenses are the thinnest VR display demonstrated to date

‘We anticipate that such lightweight and comfortable form factors may enable extended VR sessions and new use cases, including productivity.’

While the technology is just a concept, Facebook says it can slim down a pair of VR glasses by getting rid of the chunky refractive lens used in today’s VR handsets.

This refractive lens, which is usually made of a thick, curved piece of plastic or glass, contributes greatly to the weight of a headset.

It’s important because it refracts light – meaning it changes the direction of light coming from the display when it enters at an angle – to allow our eyes to focus on the image from the display. 

Shown on the left, a photograph captured with the proof-of-concept research device shown above. On the right, a photograph taken through a larger full-colour prototype

Facebook researchers propose replacing this bulky element with holographic optics, which, in comparison, look like a thin and transparent sticker.

‘You may be familiar with holographic images seen at a science museum or on your credit card, which appear to be three-dimensional with realistic depth in or out of the page,’ they say.

‘Like these holographic images, our holographic optics are a recording of the interaction of laser light with objects, but in this case the object is a lens rather than a 3D scene.’

Holographic optics require the use of laser light sources, which are more difficult to integrate but provide a much richer set of colours, Facebook said.

A common set of colours reproducible on many displays today is called the ‘sRGB colour space’ – which stands for ‘standard red, green and blue’.

sRGB was created by HP and Microsoft created in 1996 to use on monitors, printers and the internet, but it has a limited colour array and captures only a small fraction of the colours that humans can actually see.

Holographics, on the other hand, cover a much larger set of colours, including brilliant luminous shades of all the visible colour spectrum.

This figure illustrates the gamut of colours that are visible in light (outer shape). The sRGB space represents a common set of colours reproducible on many displays today. The outer triangle represents the larger set of colours reproducible on Facebook’s research prototype

The new class of near-eye displays combines the holographic optics with a methods called ‘polarization-based optical folding’ (PBOP) – which basically acts as a replacement for the thick refractive lens.

In a common VR headset, a considerable amount of empty space must be placed between the display panel and the refractive lens for the user to properly focus the image.

Usually, light from the display panel flows forward towards the lens, refracts and then continues toward the eye.

But with PBOP, light can be controlled to move both forward and backward within the lens so that this empty space can be traversed multiple times, collapsing it to a fraction of the original volume.

PBOP therefore narrows the gap between the display and the lens and ultimately reduces the bulk of the headset.

Facebook researchers have also posted a research paper describing the technology on their website, although it admits the technology is ‘purely research’ for now.

‘To our knowledge, our work demonstrates the thinnest VR display demonstrated to date, and we’re excited to see what the future holds,’ it said. 

The concept behind the specs will be presented at SIGGRAPH, the annual conference on computer graphics, which is going online this year due to the coronavirus.

WHAT IS VIRTUAL REALITY?

Virtual reality is a computer-generated simulation of an environment or situation. 

  • It immerses the user by making them feel like they are in the simulated reality throughimages and sounds
  • For example, in VR, you could feel like you’re climbing a mountain while sat at home 

Virtual reality is the term used to describe A three-dimensional, computer generated environment which can be explored and interacted with by a person. 

That person becomes part of this virtual world or is immersed within this environment and whilst there, is able to manipulate objects or perform a series of actions.

How is virtual reality achieved? 

Virtual reality is usually implemented using computer technology. There are a range of systems that are used for this purpose, such as headsets, omni-directional treadmills and special gloves. 

These are used to actually stimulate our senses together in order to create the illusion of reality. 

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How to get old Facebook back

Facebook has unveiled a radical redesign for its desktop site in an effort to make things simpler and more straightforward.

The new look is sparse and more in line with a smartphone app than a fully-formed website.

Not everyone is a fan.

Once you’ve clicked it, you’ll be given an option of choosing light mode or dark mode. From there, you can continue to use the site as normal.

But what if you don’t like it? Thankfully, Facebook has made it very easy to switch back to the ‘classic’ design if you want to.

How to get the old Facebook design back

Getting the old Facebook design back is as simple as going to the menu and clicking a switch.

However, will warn you that the classic site may look familiar but will likely be less responsive than the new version – especially if you’re using older hardware.

With that in mind, you can find the option to change back by following these steps:

  • When you’re signed in and looking at the main page, navigate to the arrow in the top-right corner of the screen.
  • Click the drop-down menu and select Switch to classic Facebook.
  • You’ll be asked to submit some feedback on your decision but you can bypass this through pressing ‘Skip’.
  • The page will re-load with the classic Facebook design.

‘Facebook.com launched in 2004 as a simple, server-rendered PHP website. Over time, we’ve added layer upon layer of new technology to deliver more interactive features,’ explained Facebook developers Ashley Watkins and Royi Hagigi in a detailed technical blog post about the architecture of the new site.

‘Each of these new features and technologies incrementally slowed the site down and made it harder to maintain,’ they continued.

‘This made it harder to introduce new experiences. Features like dark mode and saving your place in News Feed had no straightforward technical implementation. We needed to take a step back to rethink our architecture.’

Even though the user interface (UI) of the new Facebook.com may take some getting used to, if the company has sped up the process it’s likely to be a winner with users.

Adding a lot of extras to a webpage – adverts, videos, pop-ups and other reactive elements – all helps to slow the loading time. Anyone using older hardware will notice the change and likely be thanking Facebook for updating their site.

What are your thoughts on Facebook’s new look? Let us know in the comments section below.

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Facebook labels extremist Boogaloo movement a 'dangerous organization'

Facebook labels the extremist anti-government Boogaloo movement a ‘dangerous organization’ and bans 500 groups and pages – as the social media giant continues to face ad boycott for its ‘failure to tackle hate speech and racism’

  • Facebook announced Tuesday it has banned hundreds of accounts, groups and pages linked to the Boogaloo movement
  • This includes the removal of 220 accounts, 28 pages, 106 groups, and 95 Instagram accounts which pose a ‘credible threat’ to public safety, it said 
  • Another 400 groups and 100-plus pages that were hosting ‘similar content’ affiliated with the core network have also been removed
  • The labeling of Boogaloo as a ‘dangerous organization’ puts it on a par with the Islamic State group and white supremacists – both already banned 
  • The Boogaloo movement is a loosely organized extremist far-right and anti-government movement which aspires to incite a violent civil war 
  • The move comes as Facebook continues to be hammered by an ad boycott   
  • More than 160 companies have now pulled advertising as part of the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, which accuses the company of failing to tackle hate speech  
  • Clorox joined the growing list of brands boycotting the firm Monday 

Facebook has labeled the extremist anti-government Boogaloo movement a ‘dangerous organization’ and banned 500 groups and pages, as the social media giant tries to rebuild its reputation amid the ongoing ad boycott. 

The platform announced Tuesday it has banned hundreds of accounts, groups and pages linked to the Boogaloo movement, in what it describes as the ‘latest step in our commitment to ban people who proclaim a violent mission from using our platform’.

This includes the removal of 220 accounts, 28 pages, 106 groups, and 95 Instagram accounts which are part of the extremist network and pose a ‘credible threat’ to public safety, it said. 

Facebook also removed another 400 groups and 100-plus pages that were hosting ‘similar content’ affiliated with the core network but not operated by the core members.

This comes as more than 160 companies have now pulled advertising on Facebook in the last week as part of the Stop Hate for Profit campaign, which accuses the company of failing to tackle hate speech and racism posted on its platform.

People, including those with the Boogaloo movement, at an anti-lockdown protest in Michigan in May. Facebook has labeled the extremist anti-government Boogaloo movement a ‘dangerous organization’ and banned 500 groups and pages

A member of Boogaloo Bois walks next to protestors demonstrating outside Charlotte Mecklenburg Police Department in downtown Charlotte, North Carolina, in May during a racial justice rally

Facebook said the large-scale removal of Boogaloo content and sites should help slow the movement in its tracks in using the platform to recruit new members and to share content.   

‘Today we are designating a violent US-based anti-government network as a dangerous organization and banning it from our platform,’ Facebook’s statement on the news read.

‘This network uses the term boogaloo but is distinct from the broader and loosely-affiliated boogaloo movement because it actively seeks to commit violence.’   

Facebook added that the accounts were ‘actively promoting violence against civilians, law enforcement, and government officials and institutions.’ 

The labeling of Boogaloo as a ‘dangerous organization’ puts it on a par with the Islamic State group and white supremacists, both of which are already banned from its service.

The Boogaloo movement, run by people a group known as the Boogaloo Bois, is a loosely organized extremist far-right and anti-government movement which counts white supremacists in its fan base and aspires to incite a violent civil war across America.  

Some heavily armed Boogaloo Bois have been seen popping up at anti-lockdown and racial justice rallies in recent months.  

Mark Zuckerberg. The platform announced Tuesday it has banned hundreds of accounts, groups and pages linked to the Boogaloo movement, in what it describes as the ‘latest step in our commitment to ban people who proclaim a violent mission from using our platform’

Facebook said the movement dates back to 2012 and that it has been tracking it closely since last year. 

Earlier in June, Steven Carrillo, an Air Force sergeant with ties to the movement, allegedly shot dead a federal security officer and wounded his partner outside a US courthouse, ambushed and killed a California sheriff’s deputy and injured four other officers in Oakland, California. 

According to the criminal complaint, Carrillo posted in a Facebook group before the attack: ‘It’s on our coast now, this needs to be nationwide. It’s a great opportunity to target the specialty soup bois. Keep that energy going.’

‘Soup bois’ is thought to be a term that followers of the boogaloo movement use to refer to federal law enforcement agents. 

Facebook joined other tech firms in coming down hard on the movement after instant messaging firm Discord shut down the biggest boogaloo server and deleted the accounts of all 2,500 of its users. 

Some of the accounts and posts linked to the Boogaloo movement. The Boogaloo movement, run by people a group known as the Boogaloo Bois, is a loosely organized extremist far-right and anti-government movement which counts white supremacists in its fan base and aspires to incite a violent civil war across America

The users switched to an affiliated Facebook page and a subreddit, according to VICE News, leading Reddit to take the subreddit down and Facebook follow suit Tuesday.

However, they all face a difficult task to remove all references to the far-right group, as its internet-savvy members tend to keep their distance from one another and frequently change their symbols and catchphrases to avoid detection.  

Social media giants are coming under increasing pressure to clamp down on hate speech posted on their platforms.   

In the last week, more than 160 companies including some of the biggest advertisers Coca-Cola, Unilever and Starbucks have all ceased advertising their products on Facebook as part of the Stop Hate for Profit campaign.

The advertising boycott was organized by several civil rights groups, including the Anti-Defamation League, the NAACP and Sleeping Giants, who argue that Facebook and other social media platforms have not done enough to address racism, hate speech and misinformation on their platforms.

Facebook makes an estimated $70 billion annually from ads, the coalition claimed in a statement on the ADL website – so with some of its biggest clients pulling the plug on ad spend it’s marked a major blow to the firm.  

Clorox has joined the growing list of brands to have pulled its advertisements from Facebook in a protest over the social media giant’s perceived failure to stop the spread of hate on its platform


Ford then on Monday also put the brakes on all national social-media advertising for 30 days, as it re-evaluates spending on sites. Restaurant chain Denny’s said it is pausing paid advertising on Facebook starting Wednesday.

Cleaning goods giant Clorox joined the growing list of brands Monday in announcing it will be suspending all advertisements on the social media site through the end of the year.

‘As a people-centered company committed to our values, we feel compelled to take action against hate speech, which we believe will increase through the balance of the year,’ Clorox said in a Monday statement. ‘This creates an increasingly unhealthy environment for people and our purpose-driven brands.’

The Clorox Company, which also includes brands Hidden Valley Ranch and Brita, added that it would ‘maintain our planned level of advertising spending but shift to other media.’

This came after Ford also put the brakes on all national social-media advertising for 30 days, restaurant chain Denny’s said it is pausing paid advertising on Facebook starting Wednesday and Adidas, Pepsi and Best Buy all announced similar boycotts. 

Coca-Cola pulled its advertisements from Facebook Friday, saying it wasn’t officially joining the boycott, but that it had paused on paid advertising across all social media platforms globally for at least 30 days. 

A similar announcement was made by Unilever that day, which was then followed by Starbucks, who said it working with civil rights groups to ‘stop the spread of hate speech’ and would be ending all social media ads, but wasn’t officially joining the boycott at this time.   

Zuckerberg said in a Facebook Live video on Friday that the company would begin labeling ‘harmful’ content from politicians that remains ‘newsworthy’

Some major companies that have joined Facebook ad boycott

  • Unilever
  • Verizon  
  • Eddie Bauer 
  • Eileen Fisher 
  • Ben & Jerry’s
  • Patagonia
  • North Face
  • REI
  • Upwork 
  • Rakuten Viber
  • Magnolia Pictures 
  • Goodby Silverstein 
  • Dove
  • Coca-Cola 
  • Dockers 
  • Levi’s 
  • Honda 
  • Ford
  • Clorox
  • Starbucks 
  • Lululemon 
  • Denny’s
  • Adidas
  • Pepsi 
  • Best Buy 

CEO Mark Zuckerberg buckled under the pressure Friday and announced new content policies for the platform, including tighter restrictions on advertising and labels for ‘harmful’ posts from public figures. 

In a Facebook Live video he announced the company would begin labeling ‘harmful’ content from politicians that remains ‘newsworthy’. 

‘We will soon start labeling some of the content we leave up because it is deemed newsworthy, so people can know when this is the case,’ Zuckerberg said in the livestream. 

‘We’ll allow people to share this content to condemn it, just like we do with other problematic content, because this is an important part of how we discuss what’s acceptable in our society – but we’ll add a prompt to tell people that the content they’re sharing may violate our policies,’ he continued.

Zuckerberg also announced new policies cracking down on hateful language in ads, as well as guidelines on voting information.

‘We already restrict certain types of content in ads that we allow in regular posts, but we want to do more to prohibit the kind of divisive and inflammatory language that has been used to sow discord,’ Zuckerberg said.

‘So today we’re prohibiting a wider category of hateful content in ads. Specifically, we’re expanding our ads policy to prohibit claims that people from a specific race, ethnicity, national origin, religious affiliation, caste, sexual orientation, gender identity or immigration status are a threat to the physical safety, health or survival of others,’ he said.

‘We’re also expanding our policies to better protect immigrants, migrants, refugees and asylum seekers from ads suggesting these groups are inferior or expressing contempt, dismissal or disgust directed at them,’ he continued.

Though he did not name Trump, the policy comes in response to a campaign demanding Facebook impose tighter restrictions on ‘misinformation’ in the president’s campaign ads, and on his inflammatory posts. 

Twitter had already placed warning labels on some of the president’s tweets that it deemed abusive or threatening, and unlike Facebook, Twitter banned all political campaign ads.

Zuckerberg slammed the move when Twitter first labeled a Trump tweet, saying it wasn’t up to social media companies to be the ‘arbiters of truth’.

Hundreds of Facebook employees even staged a virtual walkout earlier this month after company executives declined to add a warning label to President Trump’s post that looting would lead to shooting during nationwide protests against racial inequality. 

Facebook saw its shares drop $56 billion in valuation Friday as companies joined a campaign  asking the social media giant to remove hate speech from its platform

More big firms join the #StopHateforProfit campaign 

Facebook is facing growing pressure over its hands-off approach to misinformation and inflammatory posts, including posts by US President Donald Trump that have received heavy criticism. 

A number of civil rights groups last week launched the ‘#StopHateforProfit’ campaign, encouraging companies to pull ads from Facebook.

North Face, based in California, was the first to join the campaign, with the  Anti-Defamation League, the NAACP, Sleeping Giants, Free Press and Common Sense following suit.

Starbucks, Unilever, Coca-Cola, Ford, Adidas and HP have also pulled adverts.

The campaign took out a full page ad in the Los Angeles Times pushing for companies to boycott Facebook. The social media giant reportedly made close to $70 billion in ad revenues last year.

‘What would you do with $70billion?’ the #StopHateForProfit ad asks.

‘We know what Facebook did. They allowed incitement to violence against protesters fighting for racial justice in America in the wake of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Tony McDade, Ahmaud Arbery, Rayshard Brooks and so many others’.

The ad goes on to accuse Facebook of ‘turning a blind eye to voter suppression’ and ‘amplifying white supremacists’.  

A statement from Facebook in response to the boycott also said the company invests billions each year to ensure safety and continuously works with outside experts to review and update its policies.

The company has banned 250 white supremacist organizations from Facebook and Instagram, she said, adding that the company’s substantial investment artificial intelligence technology allows Facebook to find nearly 90 percent of hate speech before users report it.

‘We know we have more work to do, and we’ll continue to work with civil rights groups, GARM, and other experts to develop even more tools, technology and policies to continue this fight,’ the spokesperson added. 

But the move has come too little too late, with the mounting number of boycotting brands erasing a staggering $56 billion from Facebook’s market value Friday.

Major companies including Unilever and Coca-Cola pulled their advertisements from the social media giant that day, joining the likes of Dove, Honda and Ben & Jerry’s and sending shares in the platform crashing to their lowest in three months. 

This dealt a hefty $7.2 billion blow to Zuckerberg’s personal fortune, pushing him down from third to fourth place on Bloomberg Billionaires Index and leaving him with a new net worth of $82.3 billion. 

Other Silicon Valley firms have also taken steps to distance themselves from the 

Reddit this week removed 2,000 subreddits, including the longstanding and highly controversial pro-Trump subreddit called ‘The_Donald’ which had about 800,000 followers and has long faced calls to be taken down.

YouTube announced its own ban on a number of white supremacist channels too as social media firms are increasingly coming under scrutiny over their response to hate speech posted on their sites. 

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Facebook loses $60billion in market value in two days

Facebook loses $60billion in market value in two days as advertising boycott continues despite Mark Zuckerberg’s attempts to backtrack on hate speech

  • Facebook’s market value dropped by roughly $60billion Monday morning as stock prices slid for a second day
  • It shook off the loss with a 1.2 percent gain Monday afternoon
  • The social media giant is facing pressure as a long list of companies pull their advertising
  • Starbucks and Ford are among the latest to join the movement tired of Facebook’s inaction on racist and violent posts
  • The list of companies  pulling their advertising grows despite attempts by CEO Mark Zuckerberg to do a u-turn on the company’s hate speech policy
  • He announced policy tweaks Friday that included labels for ‘harmful’ posts from public figures

Facebook erased almost $60billion from its market value Monday after a massive two-day stock decline as more advertisers joined the boycott of the social network.

Stocks in the world’s largest social media platform rose 1.2 percent again Monday afternoon after shaking off a loss earlier in the morning. 

The social media giant is facing a defection of advertisers tired of the racist and violent posts spreading through the social network. 

Among the long list of companies are Starbucks, who have halted advertising on all social-media platforms.   

Facebook reacted Friday with policy tweaks but the boycott list keeps growing. 

Facebook cut its market value by $60billion in two days despite CEO Mark Zuckerberg on Friday announcing policy tweaks that it hoped would appease advertisers tired of the social media giant’s inaction on posts containing hate speech on its platform

Starbucks on Sunday announced it is cutting advertising from all social media 

Pepsi is among the companies that has pulled its advertising from Facebook

A long list of companies have pulled advertising from Facebook Inc in support of a campaign that called out the social media giant for not doing enough to stop hate speech on its platforms.

The Stop Hate for Profit campaign was started by several U.S. civil rights groups after the death of black man George Floyd in police custody triggered widespread protests against racial discrimination in the United States.

Facebook makes an estimated $70 billion annually from ads, the coalition claimed in a statement on the ADL website.

The campaign has criticized Mark Zuckerberg’s decision to not moderate the U.S. president, in particular, after the Facebok CEO defended his decision not to limit Trump’s often controversial, incendiary and inaccurate posts.

Starbucks on Sunday joined the list of big companies saying it will pause its advertising on all social media. 

The U.S. coffee chain said it would pause advertising on all social media platforms while it continues discussions internally, with media partners and civil rights organizations. 

On Monday, Ford also put the brakes on all national social media advertising for the next 30 days. 

The company said hate speech and violent and racial injustice content need to be eradicated from the sites. 

Other companies in the boycott include Pepsi, Unilever, Adidas, Coca-Cola, HP, Lululemon, Clorox and Verizon.  

As the first round of pulled advertising began to be announced Friday, Facebook was hit with a 8.3 percent loss in its stocks. 

Stocks in Facebook recovered slightly on Monday afternoon after a two-day slip saw it cut $60billion from its market values. It comes as more companies join an advertising boycott

It worsened Monday morning as stocks reopened after a weekend of other companies adding their names to the list.  

Facebook has responded to the advertising boycott by introducing policy tweaks, a step-back from its earlier stance that it is not the place of a private company to intervene with what’s posted on its site.  

Zuckerberg buckled under the pressure Friday and announced new content policies for the platform, including tighter restrictions on advertising and labels for ‘harmful’ posts from public figures. 

The platform announced that it will ban a wide range of hateful language and label ads about voting with links to accurate information.  

The GOP appeared to be one of the first to face the clampdown on ‘harmful’ and ‘hateful’ content, after Facebook put a warning label on a video posted by the RNC about ‘left-wing anarchists’ Friday.   

Zuckerberg also said in a Facebook Live video Friday that company would begin labeling ‘harmful’ content from politicians that remains ‘newsworthy’.

Facebook put a warning label on a video posted by the Republican National Committee about ‘left-wing anarchists’ after CEO Mark Zuckerberg caved Friday and said the social media giant would ban hate speech on the platform following a boycott by 100 advertisers

Though he did not name Trump, the policy comes in response to a campaign demanding Facebook impose tighter restrictions on ‘misinformation’ in the president’s campaign ads, and on his inflammatory posts.

Twitter has already slapped warning labels on some of the president’s tweets that it deemed abusive or threatening, and unlike Facebook, Twitter banned all political campaign ads. 

Zuckerberg slammed the move when Twitter first labeled a Trump tweet, saying it wasn’t up to social media companies to be the ‘arbiters of truth’ – but the Facebook CEO appears to have had a change of heart following the punishing advertiser boycott. 

‘We will soon start labeling some of the content we leave up because it is deemed newsworthy, so people can know when this is the case,’ Zuckerberg said in the livestream. 

‘We’ll allow people to share this content to condemn it, just like we do with other problematic content, because this is an important part of how we discuss what’s acceptable in our society – but we’ll add a prompt to tell people that the content they’re sharing may violate our policies,’ he continued.

Yet it doesn’t appear to satisfy the critics who say Facebook has profited handsomely by allowing unfettered speech on its site. 

Zuckerberg said in a Facebook Live video on Friday that the company would begin labeling ‘harmful’ content from politicians that remains ‘newsworthy’

However, Daniel Salmon, a BMO Capital Markets analyst, noted that Facebook has 8million advertisers and the current boycott would not significantly hurt its revenue. 

He told Business Insider that pressure to invest in safety and security would have the bigger financial impact the social media site in the coming years. 

Facebook’s market loss comes as  Reddit announced Monday that it had shut down a forum for supporters of Donald Trump amid an overhaul of its content policies as Amazon’s live-streaming platform, Twitch, also announced that it had temporarily banned the president’s channel for ‘hateful conduct’.

According to Reddit, it has banned about 2,000 subreddits, the majority of which were inactive. 

The list included The_Donald and the left-wing forum ChapoTrapHouse. The_Donald forum housed more than 790,000 users who share content in support of Trump. The ChapoTrapHouse has more than 160,000 users. 

The site’s new content policy said communities and users that promote hate based on identity or vulnerability would be banned. 

Reddit said Monday that it had shut down a forum for supporters of Trump amid an overhaul of its content policies. Reddit said The_Donald community was banned for violating site rules

Also on Monday, Twitch said it had temporarily banned Trump’s channel over its hateful conduct policy. The notification above pops up in the search for Trump’s channel

And according to Reddit, The_Donald forum has consistently broken the site’s rules by allowing people to harass others with hate speech.

Also on Monday, Twitch said it had temporarily banned Trump’s channel over its hateful conduct policy. 

‘Hateful conduct is not allowed on Twitch. In line with our policies, President Trump’s channel has been issued a temporary suspension from Twitch for comments made on stream, and the offending content has been removed,’ a Twitch spokeswoman said,

One of the streams identified by the spokeswoman was a rebroadcast of a 2016 Trump rally in which the president said Mexico was sending rapists to the U.S.   

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