Categories
Lifestyle

Outdoor diners in New York City hogging tables, over drinking and stealing wine glasses: report

Fox News Flash top headlines for July 5

Fox News Flash top headlines are here. Check out what’s clicking on Foxnews.com.

Apparently, New York’s restaurant-goers are behaving badly.

After months of only providing take-out and delivery services, New York City restaurants were allowed to reopen for outdoor dining in late June. According to some restaurant owners and workers, however, the city’s residents have been a bit of a handful after spending months in their apartments.

Some New York City restaurants have reported that customers have been stealing wine glasses and hogging tables (which are limited) for hours at a time.
(iStock)

According to some workers, New Yorkers are going to multiple bars in a day, drinking heavily and not practicing social distancing, the New York Post reports. Some establishments have even reported that customers have been stealing wine glasses and hogging tables (which are limited) for hours at a time.

CLICK HERE TO GET THE FOX NEWS APP

Victor Jung, director of operations at Petaluma in the city, told the news outlet, “On a nice weekend, the Upper East Side has become like Mardi Gras, with people going from bar to bar. By the time some of them sit down for meals, they are pretty smashed and they don’t social distance. We’ve seen people throw their mask on the ground. But mostly, they take it out by not tipping us. I’ve heard this from other restaurants on the block as well.”

FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK FOR MORE FOX LIFESTYLE NEWS

Another chef, who asked not to be identified, also spoke with the Post. According to him, his restaurant has had issues with people refusing to wear masks. Another problem they’ve reportedly encountered is people stealing wine glasses.

One of the main issues the chef reported to the Post was people refusing to give up their tables. Restaurants still have limited seating, but some patrons are reportedly staying for extremely long periods of time. This makes it harder for the restaurants to flip the tables, thus reducing the overall income for the evening.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

New York reports 918 new coronavirus infections, its highest total since mid-June

New York state reported 918 new coronavirus infections and nine deaths from COVID-19, Gov. Andrew Cuomo said Friday.

The 918 figure recorded Thursday represents the first time more than 900 new infections have been reported since June 12, when 916 people tested positive for the virus statewide.

“The more than 900 new cases in New York yesterday, while representing just 1.38% of tests, is a reminder that the virus is still here,” the Democratic governor said in a news release.

He added, “I cannot repeat enough that our actions today — those of individuals being smart and following all precautions, and local governments enforcing the state’s guidelines — will determine which direction these numbers go.”

The percentage of New York state residents who have tested positive for COVID-19 each day has hovered around 1% to 2% over the past week, despite concerns that protests last month over the death of George Floyd might have fueled a new surge.

More than 24,800 people with COVID-19 have died in New York hospitals and nursing homes since the first deaths were reported in March.

Share this article:

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Inside the notorious New York prison where Ghislaine Maxwell could be locked up and pal Jeffrey Epstein killed himself

RATS, sewage, and "gulag" conditions may await Ghislaine Maxwell at the same prison which became the tomb of her pal Jeffrey Epstein.

British socialite Maxwell may face being locked up in the infamous Metropolitan Correctional Center (MCC) in New York.


It comes as she was arrested by the FBI on suspicion of being part of Epstein's sex trafficking ring on Thursday.

The facility has come under increasing scrutiny after Epstein managed to commit suicide in his cell as he was awaiting trial last August.

Grim details have emerged of conditions at the towering 12-storey jail that holds up to 800 people awaiting their day before a judge at the nearby federal court house.

The same fate could await Maxwell after she was picked up by FBI agents in New Hampshire.

Experts said if she's brought to New York she may face a state at the MCC.

Built in 1975, the grim building has a housed infamous criminals including drug lord El Chapo, crime boss John Gotti, World Trade Centre bomber Ramzi Yousef, and extremist cleric Abu Hamza.

El Chapo described his stay in the prison as "psychological and mental torture 24 hours a day".

Prisoners have claimed to have seen rats in their cells, said there is no natural light, and very poor sanitary conditions, reports the BBC.

It is claimed prisoners go to the bathroom in the shower stalls, raw sewage has spilled into the women's unit, and the place infested with roaches.

And despite holding around 800 prisoners, it was only designed to have a capacity for 449.

Brooklyn College professor Jeanne Theoharis, claimed last year the jail is like a "gulag" – and is more comparable to prisons in "Iran or Russia".

She told The Gothamist: "[It's] filthy, freezing, no natural light, isolation so extreme that you're punished for speaking through the walls, absurd rules like prisoners not getting to see the newspapers unless they're 30 days old."


Maxwell could end up on the prison's one female wing, which takes up two floors and features a gym, a kitchen, a common area and five TV sets.

The prison is also said to be understaffed, with some officers left physically exhausted after 16 hour shifts.

Between 2015 and 2018 there were 19 suicide attempts at the prison – which reportedly has a chronic lack of mental health support.

And before Epstein's death, there had not been a death by suicide since 2006.

Lawyer Joshua Dratel told The Guardian: "There’s a lack of standards of care for inmates.

"It’s a difficult place for inmates, it’s a difficult place for staff, it’s a difficult place for us to visit.”

He said lawyers may have to wait for up to two hours to see their clients, sometimes due to the lifts regularly breaking down.

Epstein was being held on MCC's Special Housing Unit, where he was meant to be under 24-hour monitoring and given daily psychiatric evaluations.

He was sent there after being found on the floor of his cell with neck injuries after an apparent attempted suicide.

Two guards were meant to check on him every 30 minutes, but reportedly this did not happen on the night of his death.

He was also meant to have a cellmate, but he had been transferred away and no replacement had been moved in.

His death – which denied his victims the chance to see justice done – saw the focus on the probe shift to Maxwell and his other associates.

Some however question whether Epstein did really kill himself, with conspiracy theories about his death continuing to rage.


Prosecutors said investigators found Maxwell "hiding" on a 156-acre property in New Hampshire she bought in cash back in December 2019.

Maxwell and her attorney Lawrence Vogelman faced the Concord courtroom via video link shortly after 3.30 pm for around 20 minutes, after agreeing to a remote hearing.

Magistrate Judge Andrea Johnstone told Maxwell she would be temporarily detained and "transported to the charging district" – the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York (SDNY) – where hearings would begin accordingly. 

She will either be held overnight in a local jail or transported immediately back to the Big Apple unless the New Hampshire judge there releases her on bail.

The US government fear Maxwell, faced with the prospect of 35 years behind bars, is "an extreme flight risk" meaning she could be denied bail.

Citing her alleged "disturbing and callous" conduct, prosecutors listed her international ties, dual citizenship, wealth, and lack of meaningful ties to the United States as reasons she may flee.

Maxwell is facing a slew of charges for allegedly conspiring with Epstein to abuse minors, as well as perjury for lying during a sworn deposition.

She is alleged to have been the one who introduced sex slave Virginia Giuffre to Prince Andrew – who strongly denies having sex with the teen.

Speaking at the US Attorney's office in Manhattan three hours before the hearing, prosecutor Audrey Strauss described the "unspeakable truth" and role Maxwell allegedly played in recruiting underage girls for Epstein.

She acknowledged concerns for Maxwell's safety once she's behind bars, saying "we are sensitive to that concern and certainly we’ll be in dialogue with the Bureau of Prisons about it" three hours before her court appearance.

But Strauss also told reporters how Maxwell would "befriend young girls" as part of her alleged grooming process.

The attorney described how the alleged madam would take them to the movies, ask about their families, and "develop a rapport with them."

It stated that from 1994 to 1997, she allegedly "assisted, facilitated, and contributed to Jeffrey Epstein's abuse of minor girls," by helping him to "recruit, groom, and ultimately abuse" underage victims.

Maxwell has strongly denied any wrongdoing, and until this week the accusations hadn't resulted in criminal charges.

She is the youngest child of disgraced media tycoon and British publisher Robert Maxwell.

She moved to New York in 1991 after her father's death and dated Epstein a year later, but remained close with him for decades after their breakup.

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

The New York Times’ metro section mysteriously disappeared

It’s still called the New York Times, but good luck finding any section of the print edition that’s devoted exclusively to news from New York.

The paper’s March 23 edition ran a “Note to Our Readers,” in which it said the New York section would not be appearing that day. It hasn’t returned since.

“There is no separate New York section,” the March 23 note said as the coronavirus had begun ravaging the city and was seemingly the only story in town. “New York coverage is included as part of the Tracking an Outbreak section on pages A4-A13.”

That was the last time the New York section was mentioned, and there has been no note to explain where it went.

The Metro desk, overseen by Associate Managing Editor Cliff Levy, has long been viewed as a stepchild to a paper that always seemed more interested in national and international news.

Publisher A.G. Sulzberger is said to be no fan of Metro or New York as a separate section, since local stories tend to pull less traffic on the Web.

In 2008, the Metro section lost its stand-alone status, but still had its own heading on several pages of news in the section that fronts the paper. There are estimated to be more than 50 editorial staffers on the desk, following voluntary buyouts two years ago to the department’s editorial staffers.

In Tuesday’s paper, one page of the five pages devoted to coronavirus carried a “New York region” label. But most days even that tip doesn’t appear.

“In the beginning, it made a lot of sense, it was obviously all COVID, all the time,” said one source. “But New York is not ground zero for coronavirus coverage anymore. And they still have not brought the pages back.”

“It feels strategic,” the source added. “Maybe they don’t intend to ever bring it back. Maybe they feel it will be better to have stories sprinkled throughout the paper.

A Times spokeswoman did not return a call seeking comment.

Share this article:

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
World News

Gritty images show New York City in 80s as fears rise now of NYPD cuts

A return to this? Gritty images show New York City ravaged by crime in the 70s and 80s when the Big Apple was dubbed ‘Fear City’ – amid growing concern it will ‘relapse’ as $1 billion is stripped from the NYPD

  • In the 1970s, crime-ridden and grimy New York City was a dangerous place where the NYPD warned people to never take the graffiti-filled subway 
  • By 1974, then Mayor Abraham Beame faced nearly $10 billion in debt and cut the police department. The NYPD then issued a pamphlet, Welcome to Fear City: A Survival Guide for Visitors to the City of New York
  • In 1975, the city almost declared bankruptcy and asked for federal aid but was denied
  • Crime persisted throughout the 1980s while people squatted in abandoned buildings left in disrepair by landlords who couldn’t pay property taxes. Crack and other drugs invaded the city and became an epidemic
  • There were glimmers of hope as Wall Street did mostly well in the 1980s but crime and filth persisted and the Central Park Jogger rape case gripped and tore at the city. It wasn’t until the 1990s that crime started to go down
  • Because of the COVID-19 pandemic and lockdown, New York City is ‘$9 billion in the hole’ and may cut jobs
  • The city has also been rocked by protests over the murder of George Floyd and police brutality
  • Mayor Bill de Blasio said he would cut the NYPD’s $6 billion budget by $1 billion. Over 270 uniformed cops have retired since the protests, according to the New York Post
  • It is unclear when Broadway will reopen and as COVID surges in other parts of the nation, the city’s reopening, such as indoor dining, is currently being reconsidered 

The shadow of the 1970s loomed large over New York City’s next decade. And echoes of that crime-ridden era are resonating today.

In the 1970s, the city faced $10 billion in debt, teetered on the knife’s edge of bankruptcy, and then Mayor Abraham Beame was forced to cut the police, fire and sanitation departments. Every type of crime – robberies, assaults, murders, grand larcenies – was up. No where was safe, including and especially the subways, every inch of which was covered wth graffiti.

The NYPD revolted, going so far as to issue a pamphlet called Welcome to Fear City: A Survival Guide for Visitors to the City of New York. Trash littered the streets. Landlords abandoned buildings because they couldn’t or wouldn’t pay property taxes. Fires burned through the Bronx. President Gerald Ford’s administration refused to help, spurring a famous headline that declared Ford to City: Drop Dead.  

Crime persisted in the 1980s and the crack and the HIV/AIDS epidemics took hold of the city. But there were signs of hope. Wall Street and real estate began to come back and unemployment went down. Ed Koch, who was mayor from 1978 to 1990, focused on rebuilding neighborhoods. Critics said this led to gentrification and it sparked a riot in Tompkins Square Park in 1988. Police used a heavy hand against the homeless, drug dealers and users that lived in the Alphabet City spot in Manhattan’s East Village.

In March, New York City screeched to a halt to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The heart of the city’s economy, which includes tourism and theater, its small businesses, and restaurants and bars, closed. It now faces a $9 billion hole in its budget – echoing the 1970s. During that decade, then Mayor Abraham Beame was forced to cut the police, fire and sanitation departments while crime soared. Crime persisted into the 1980s. Above, the NYPD frisks a man, who may have been homeless, near the Port Authority in Manhattan in January 1988

Mayor Abraham Beame asked President Gerald Ford and the federal government for help because the city had $10 billion in total debt. The administration refused, spurring a famous headline that declared, Ford to City: Drop Dead. Due to the budget constraints, the city cut services and trash was not collected. New York City almost filed for bankruptcy in 1975. Above, police arrest a man accused of being a crack dealer in February 1989 in the Bronx. The police officer on the left holds a bag that contains crack vials

Now, Times Square is a tourist haven that thronged with theatergoers before the pandemic shutdown. But in the 1970s and ’80s, it was populated with pornography, peep shows and sex workers. Rudy Giuliani, who was mayor from 1994 to 2001, made it a top priority to clean up Times Square. Above, sailors, probably during Fleet Week, outside of a 24-hour peep show that offers ‘The Best Porn in NYC’ 

After Mayor Beame cut the police department due to the city being billions in debt, the NYPD issued a Welcome to Fear City: A Survival Guide for Visitors to the City of New York. The pamphlet, which was distributed in June 1975, had guidelines, such as ‘stay off the streets after 6 P.M.,’ ‘do not walk,’ and ‘avoid public transportation.’ Tourists were to avoid the subway at all costs. Above, people ride the graffitied train in the 1980s

An emblem of death – a skull in a black hood – graced the cover of Welcome to Fear City: A Survival Guide for Visitors to the City of New York. Every type of crime – murders, robberies, assaults –  was up in the 1970s. Crime continued into the 1980s as New York City was hit hard by crack and a HIV/AIDS crisis. Above, three police officer in Times Square when it was gritty and dangerous are in 1981. Behind the trio is a marquee that states, ‘Touch Me’

Today, like in the 1970s, the NYPD faces cuts to its department. The murder of George Floyd, a black man, at the hands of a white Minneapolis police officer in May has caused a nationwide wave of protests. In New York City, protestors have been outside of City Hall calling for the NYPD to be defunded. Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council are considering decreasing the police department’s current $6 billion in funding by a billion. Above, plainclothes officers arrest a man, center, for driving while intoxicated on 14th Street in 1985 

There were glimmers of optimism in the 1980s. Wall Street and real estate began to pick up. Culturally, the city thrived as cheap rents and squatting attracted musicians, artists and writers. Hip hop, which started in the 1970s, began to take hold. Above, two boys enjoy the day on a quadracycle in Bushwick, Brooklyn

Crime was so rampant in the 1970s that some citizens took it upon themselves to police. Brooklyn native Curtis Sliwa formed the Guardian Angels. Sliwa was a McDonald’s manager in the Bronx. ‘The Bronx was slipping into the abyss in the-mid 70s,’ he told DailyMail.com in November 2017. ‘It was burning down block by block. Gangs controlled whole neighborhoods. I had to take the subways, because I was living in Brooklyn at the time, which was also earning the nickname ‘Crooklyn.’ And so from riding the trains to walking the streets to managing a McDonald’s in the Bronx, it was chaos – anarchy.’ Above, three Guardian Angels – one of which sports the signature red beret – in Times Square in 1988

Koch lost to David Dinkins at the end of the decade. The Central Park Jogger case, in which a white woman was violently beaten and raped while on a run in April 1989, rocked the city. Five young black teenagers went to prison for the rape but all were later exonerated. Race tensions continued with a riot in Crown Heights, Brooklyn in 1991.

Crime started to recede during the Dinkins administration but it wasn’t until Rudy Giuliani became mayor in 1994 that crime truly went down. Giuliani and his new police commissioner William Bratton implemented the so-called ‘broken windows’ policy that focused on minor crimes, such jumping the turnstyle to get on the subway for free and ending graffiti-filled trains. Giuliani also focused on cleaning up Times Square, an area that was populated with pornography, peep shows and sex workers.  

It is unclear the extent that ‘broken windows’ worked and critics pointed out it disproportionately focused on low-income communities and people on color, but murders and crime went down in the latter half of the 1990s and crime remained down until the increase of shootings that have hit the city lately.

Giuliani shepherded the city through the tragedy of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks and its aftermath. And New York City came roaring back. 

During Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s three terms from 2002 to 2013, New York City enjoyed growth and prosperity – although his stop-and-frisk policy of stopping teens and young men remains controversial. Current Mayor Bill de Blasio campaigned and won on a platform of equality, such as building affordable housing, and a different type of policing and department than Bloomberg. 

But the city screeched to a halt in March due to the threat of the COVID-19 pandemic and instituted a lockdown to curb the virus that has killed over 17, 600 New Yorkers. 

The lifeblood of the economy that included tourism, the service industry such as restaurants and bars, and small businesses closed. After years of the city’s budgets being in the green, it is now faced with a $9 billion hole, high unemployment and a wave protests against the police brutality and the murder of George Floyd, which was captured on video. On May 25, a white Minneapolis police officer put his knee on Floyd’s neck for over seven minutes after an arrest over the alleged use of a counterfeit $20 at a store.

The protests were mainly peaceful, but there was looting of high-end retail stores on Fifth Avenue, in Soho and Union Square. Shootings have spiked and the mystifying trend of popping off fireworks has rocketed. De Blasio’s relationship with the NYPD has been rocky, and the New York Post reported that 272 uniformed cops have retired. The City Council aims to cut $1 billion from the department budget while an ‘Occupy City Hall’ movement to defund the police continues.

Ed Koch, who was mayor from 1978 to 1990, focused on rebuilding neighborhoods. Critics said this led to gentrification and it sparked a riot in Tompkins Square Park in 1988. Police used a heavy hand against the homeless, drug dealers and users that lived in the Alphabet City spot in Manhattan’s East Village. Above, men are up against the wall as the cops search and arrest them in Harlem in 1987

Above, three young men sport red Nike jackets in Harlem in 1988. In 1989, Mayor Koch lost to David Dinkins. The Central Park Jogger case, in which a white woman was violently beaten and raped while on a run in April 1989, rocked the city. Five young black teenagers went to prison for the rape but all were later exonerated. David Dinkins, who served from 1990 to 1993, was the city’s first black mayor

Homeless was an issue during both the 1970s and 1980s. In both those decades, sex workers were out in the open and clearly visible. Areas that are now upscale, such as parts of Hell’s Kitchen and under the High Line, were known for spots to pick up both male and female sex workers. And of course, Times Square. Above, women working in New York City in 1988

In the 1980s, the stock market made modest gains until the October 19, 1987 when markets plunged and Wall Street lost $500 billion. But there was cause for optimism that Wall Street and real estate began to come back and unemployment went down. Above, workers on Wall Street leave at the end of the day after that October 19, 1987 crash

Crime started to recede during the Dinkins administration but it wasn’t until Rudy Giuliani became mayor in 1994 that crime truly went down. Giuliani and his new police commissioner William Bratton implemented the so-called ‘broken windows’ policy that focused on minor crimes, such jumping the turnstyle to get on the subway for free and ending graffiti-filled trains. Giuliani also focused on cleaning up Times Square, an area that was populated with pornography, peep shows and sex workers, seen above in the 1980s

The World Trade Center towers, seen above on June 3, 1985 originally was comprised of seven buildings. The complex, which cost $400 million to build, opened in April 4, 1973. It long stood as a symbol of American finance. It was bombed on February 26, 1993. On September 11, 2001, two planes crashed into the towers and they both collapsed. The terrorist attack cost nearly 3,000 lives. It took months to clean up the site and then rebuild towers of the complex. Mayor Rudy Giuliani shepherded the city through the tragedy of the September 11, 2001 terror attacks and its aftermath. And New York City came roaring back

During Mayor Michael Bloomberg’s three terms from 2002 to 2013, New York City enjoyed growth and prosperity – although his stop-and-frisk policy of stopping teens and young men remains controversial. Current Mayor Bill de Blasio campaigned and won on a platform of equality, such as building affordable housing, and a different type of policing and department than Bloomberg. Above, boys and teens outside of a boarded-up building in the 1980s

During the 1970s, many landlords couldn’t or wouldn’t pay their property taxes and let their buildings fell into disrepair. Many buildings were abandoned and boarded up. There were also fires in the Bronx. Hip hop is said to have started in the Bronx in the 1970s. Above, teenagers breakdance next to a wall with graffiti in the Bronx in 1984

Above, a taxi without wheels in New York City in 1987. Due to COVID-19 and the lockdown, New York City now faces a $9 billion budget hole. Protests continue to defund the NYPD with Mayor Bill de Blasio and the City Council contemplating $1 billion in cuts to the police force that would include cutting around 1,100 police recruits, Politico reported. Protesters who have been camped outside of City Hall for days say cut is not enough

The nationwide protests against police brutality after the murder of George Floyd, a black man who died after a white Minneapolis police officer put his knee on his neck for over seven minutes on May 25 have mostly been peaceful. In New York City, there was looting of high-end retail stores on Fifth Avenue, in Soho and Union Square. Shootings have spiked and the mystifying trend of popping off fireworks has rocketed. De Blasio’s relationship with the NYPD has been rocky, and the New York Post reported that 272 uniformed cops have retired. Above, police arrest pro-life protesters against abortion at a Planned Parenthood in Second Avenue on January 13, 1989

Source: Read Full Article

Categories
Celebrities

Mark Hamill and Marilou York Met at the Most Unexpected Location

Mark Hamill is known to multiple generations of movie fans for playing one of the most iconic characters in cinematic history: Luke Skywalker in Star Wars. But Hamill isn’t Skywalker. He’s a man with a normal man, with a normal family. Hamill has been with his wife, Marilou York, for over 40 years. While Hamill is accustomed to bringing spellbinding stories from a galaxy far, far away to the big screen, the story of his marriage is more incredible than any of those. 

Let’s take a closer look at how Hamill met his wife at an extremely unexpected location — and how they’re still going strong today.

Mark Hamill’s biography

According to Biography.com, Hamill was born in 1951 in Oakland, California. Hamill’s big break came in 1977 when he starred in Star Wars as Luke Skywalker. He also starred in the film’s sequels, The Empire Strikes Back and Return of the Jedi. Through the years Hamill became well regarded for his voiceover work. His most famous voiceover role was as the Joker in Batman: The Animated Series. He’s also made vocal cameos in nearly every piece of Star Wars media.

When Disney purchased the rights to future Star Wars films in 2012, Hamill was brought back into the fold to reprise his classic role. Hamill starred in the final seconds of 2015’s The Force Awakens. He had a much bigger part in 2017’s The Last Jedi. Hamill returned for his swan song to the series in last year’s The Rise of Skywalker.

The Hamill family

One would think that after starring in some of the biggest blockbusters of all time, Hamill would be on track for the stereotypical career of a big Hollywood star. But Hamill’s career and life have been anything but conventional. Unlike many Hollywood stars, Hamill has a fairly normal family life. He’s been married to his wife Marilou for decades. According to Good Morning America, they have three grown children — Chelsea, Nathan, and Griffin. Hamill’s wife said the couple doesn’t live the standard Hollywood lifestyle: “We don’t live in town, so we don’t go in and do all the party circuits.” 

It’s refreshing to see someone with such a well-adjusted family life, especially in a town that’s as dangerous to marriages as Hollywood. But Hamill and his family have a solid foundation. It may lead you to wonder: where did that foundation begin? The answer to that question may be different from what you expect. It was at a dentist’s office. 

The unexpected location where Mark Hamill met Marilou York

View this post on Instagram

Happy 41st anniversary to my lovely parents.

A post shared by Chelsea Hamill (@chelseahamill) on

Yes, that’s right: Hamill and his wife met at a dentist’s office. Hamill had an appointment and York was working there as a dental hygienist. Hamill told People Magazine that it was not love at first sight from his wife’s perspective: “She came into the waiting room in jeans, white coat, breasts like melons, looking like a Vargas painting. I said, ‘They let you dress like that at work?’ She said, ‘Yeah. Next.’ ” 

Hamill soon took her out on a date to a screening of Star Wars. York couldn’t resist commenting on a dental aspect of the film few others not in her field would have noticed: “There was this one close-up of a minor character, curling his lips back from his teeth. She leaned over to me and whispered, ‘Bad caps.’ “

York and Hamill actually broke up after that as Hamill sowed his wild oats as a young superstar. Their love was too strong, however, and soon Hamill’s desire to start a family and the couple’s love for each other conquered all. They were married soon thereafter and have been together ever since. 

Source: Read Full Article